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As the season changes and schools reopen, you can prepare your home with these fall cleaning tasks. Unlike spring cleaning, which focuses on deep cleaning the interior of your home, fall provides an opportunity to handle both indoor and outdoor chores before the weather gets too cold. If you want your home to be clean and organized before the major holidays hit, here’s what to focus on.

Fall cleaning task


1. Wash Windows – Interior and Exterior

Fall may be the last chance to wash your windows before cold weather settles in. You can wash windows yourself with one of our easy DIY window cleaner recipes or hire a window washing company. The average cost for exterior window cleaning is about $250. To clean the exterior windows yourself you’ll need a ladder, a bucket, dawn dishsoap, a sponge, squeegee, and towel.


2. Power Wash Your Siding

Banish mold and mildew by power washing your siding. Use a garden hose or a power washer on the lowest setting for brick or vinyl siding. Use a hose, an appropriate cleaner, and a soft-bristled brush if your home has a more delicate siding, like stained wood.


3. Clean Outdoor Furniture

Outdoor furniture takes a beating during busy summer months. It gets drinks and food spilled on it and can also build up spider webs, dirt, and mildew. If you have a power washer, spray down your outdoor furniture before storing it for the winter. If you don’t have a power washer, use a hose, dish soap, and a soft-bristled scrub brush.


4. Clean Your Gutters

Overflowing gutters lead to a rotting roof, a flooded basement, and foundation problems. Clean gutters twice per year – spring and fall- to keep them in good shape. You can hire a gutter cleaning company for a national average of $163. 

To clean gutters yourself, you’ll need a ladder, safety equipment, a gutter scoop, and a garden hose. Use the gutter scoop to remove leaves and other debris, and then flush the gutters with your hose.


5. Clean Your Ceiling Fans and Change Their Rotation

Dusting ceiling fans is an often overlooked chore, but now is the perfect time to do it. You can use a Swiffer duster, feather duster, sock, or damp paper towel to remove thick layers of dust from the fan. Then, use a gentle spray to wipe each blade and around the light fixture.

After cleaning your fan, change the rotation. During the summer, your ceiling fan should spin counterclockwise, which pushes air down, helping cool off the room. In the cooler months, reverse the rotation of your fan blades to circulate warm air.


6. Clean Cobwebs Off the Ceiling

Use your duster or a broom to remove all cobwebs and dust from the ceiling. If the ceiling still looks dirty, wash it with a microfiber cloth dampened in a dish soap and water mix.


7. Wash the Walls and Baseboards

Wash your walls twice yearly to keep your paint job fresh and clean. Start by using a broom or duster to knock down all the cobwebs and dirt. Then, fill a bucket with warm water and a few squirts of dish soap. Dampen a microfiber rag in the mixture and wash the walls from top to bottom.

Rinse out your rag as needed and replace the water/dish soap mixture when the water appears brown.t


8. Deep Clean Appliances

Fall equals back-to-school season, which means you need to have a tidy kitchen and laundry room. Clean the inside and outside of all appliances, including:

9. Clean Out Your Pantry

A clean pantry makes it easy to grab items for school lunches, make breakfast on busy mornings, and put away the groceries. Fall is the perfect time to go through all food and get rid of anything expired, stale, or no longer needed.


10. Launder Curtains, Bedding, Rugs

Your curtains can build up a considerable amount of dust over the spring and summer seasons. Keep them in pristine condition by washing them twice per year. Before putting them in the washer, use a lint roller or duster to remove built-up dust. Then, launder per the care instructions.

Also, wash your shower curtain and bathroom rugs, which are often machine washable. You can vacuum and spot treat stains on larger area rugs.

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